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My daughter, Olivia, surprised us all recently with her voice. We knew she could play piano, violin, ukulele and the melodica, but we didn’t know she could sing! Here’s a video of her singing “La Vie en Rose” by Edith Pilaf at Sandy Connolly’s Crescendo Music Studio Summer Recital.

 

Here’s the audio file if you’d like to add it to your iTunes library :)

A little history from Wikipedia:
The song’s title can be translated as “Life in Rosy Hues” or “Life Through Rose-Colored Glasses”; its literal meaning is “Life in Pink”.

The lyrics and melody of the song were written by Édith Piaf herself, but the melody was said officially to have been composed and registered by Louis Guglielmi (known as Louiguy) only, since at the time, due to the stringent registration requirements of SACEM, Piaf did not have the necessary qualifications to be able to copyright her work with SACEM. Piaf offered the song to Marianne Michel, who slightly modified the lyrics, changing “les choses” (“things”) for “la vie” (“life”). English lyrics for the song were later written by Mack David and Frank Eyton. In 1943 Piaf had performed at a nightclub/bordello called “la vie en rose”. Initially, Piaf’s peers and songwriting team did not think the song would be successful, finding it weaker than the rest of her repertoire. Having listened to their advice, the singer put the song aside, only to change her mind the next year. The song was performed live in concert for the first time in 1946. It became a favorite with audiences. “La Vie en rose” was the song that made Piaf internationally famous, with its lyrics telling about retaken love and appealing to those who had survived the difficult wartime.

“La Vie en rose” was released on a 10″ single in 1947 by Columbia Records, a division of EMI, with “Un refrain courait dans la rue” making the B-side. It met with a warm reception and sold a million copies in the USA. It was the biggest-selling single of 1948 in Italy, and the ninth biggest-selling single in Brazil in 1949. Piaf performed the song in the 1948 French movie Neuf garçons, un coeur. The first of Piaf’s albums to include “La Vie en rose” was the 10″ Chansons parisiennes, released in 1950. The song appeared on most of Piaf’s subsequent albums, and on numerous greatest hits compilations. The song went on to become Piaf’s signature song and her trademark hit, sitting with “Milord” and “Non, je ne regrette rien” among her best-known and most recognizable tunes. Encouraged by its success, Piaf wrote 80 more songs in her career.